The history of the battle of somme

Lord Kitchener was a supporter of the theory of attrition — that eventually you would grind down your enemy and they would have to yield. During my whole life I have not found a happier hunting ground than in the course of the Somme Battle. InDouglas Haig had been a lieutenant-general in command of I Corps and was promoted to command the First Army in early and then the BEF in December, which eventually comprised five armies with sixty divisions.

Allied soldiers were easy targets. By the end of the battle, in Novemberthe British had lostthe French lost nearlymen and the GermansThe German defence in the area was based on the second line and numerous fortified villages and farms north from Maurepas at Combles, Guillemont, Falfemont Farm, Delville Wood and High Wood, which were mutually supporting.

Rapid expansion created many vacancies for senior commands and specialist functions, which led to many appointments of retired officers and inexperienced newcomers. InDouglas Haig had been a lieutenant-general in command of I Corps and was promoted to command the First Army in early and then the BEF in December, which eventually comprised five armies with sixty divisions.

Bread, meat, sugar, eggs and milk were rationed. Casualties just kept rising as the Somme became a grueling battle of attrition. Later in the year, the Franco-British were able to attack on the Somme and at Verdun sequentially and the French recovered much of the ground lost on the east bank of the Meuse in October and December.

Quite as many died on the enemy wire as on the ground, like fish caught in the net. Yet many broke down — only 21 made it to the front line.

Battle of the Somme

You need to have JavaScript enabled to view this clip. Allied military leaders were too optimistic The Allies had overestimated the damage done to German forces after seven days of bombardment. It is too early to as yet give anything but the barest particulars, as the fighting is developing in intensity, but the British troops have already occupied the German front line.

Guillemont was on the right flank of the British sector, near the boundary with the French Sixth Army. British machine gunners firing during the Battle of the Somme. He saw the military success of the battle as all-important.

First Battle of the Somme

The British would then have to begin a hasty relief offensive and would also suffer huge losses. However, the exhausted British soldiers could not progress any further — they sustained 29, casualties. German overestimation of the cost of Verdun to the French contributed to the concentration of German infantry and guns on the north bank of the Somme.

Barbed wire obstacles had been enlarged from one belt 5—10 yards 4. However, during the battle media information on the Somme was less than accurate. The Battle of the Somme, fought in northern France, was one of the bloodiest of World War One.

For five months the British and French armies fought the Germans in a brutal battle of attrition on a. May 26,  · The Battle of the Somme has been immortalised as the greatest disaster in British military history, when 57, British soldiers became casualties in a single day, 1st July -.

The Battle of the Somme started on July 1 st It lasted until November For many people, the Battle of the Somme was the battle that symbolised the horrors of warfare in World War One; this one battle had a marked effect on overall casualty figures and seemed to epitomise the futility of trench warfare.

The Battle of the Somme (French: Bataille de la Somme; German: Schlacht an der Somme), also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British Empire and French Empire against the German Empire.

The Battle of the Somme was one of the largest battles of World War I, and among the bloodiest in all of human history.

Why Was the Battle of the Somme So Deadly?

The Battle of the Somme was one of the largest battles of World War I, and. The Battle of the Somme, fought in northern France, was one of the bloodiest of World War One. For five months the British and French armies fought the Germans in a brutal battle of attrition on a.

The history of the battle of somme
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World War I: Battle of The Somme - Learning History